Baseboards and Window Trim

Trimmed Gable Window

Trimmed Gable Window

Sunday, September 27, 2015

I had a pretty productive and relatively fun day working on the tiny house yesterday. I spent most of the morning cutting up all of the baseboards and cabinet toe kicks for the entire house. I didn’t nail them all in place yet, but I did test fit them and they all look really good.

When I was done with the baseboards, I spent a couple of hours doing some complicated woodworking to create the interior trim for the gable window. The trim for the gable window was already complicated because of the pentagonal shape of the window. The shape required me to cut several pieces of trim at a 53° angle, which is more than my compound miter saw can handle unless I turn the boards perpendicular to the saw. The installation was further complicated by the fact that for some reason the window did not get installed perfectly plumb. As a result, although the bottom of the window frame is flush with the interior siding, the top of the window sticks out past the siding by almost a quarter of an inch. To deal with this, I needed to notch the back side of each piece of trim to a different depth at the top of the piece than the bottom. This required creating a jig where I turned each piece of trim on its side and lined up my circular saw guide along the edge of that piece at an angle so the saw would notch more material off of one end than the other. As I said, it took me a couple of hours. However, I eventually got it all to work and only created a few scrap pieces of trim in the process. I think the final effect of the trim around the gable window is pretty nice and I’m rather proud of all the woodworking I had to do to create it.

Window Frame Sticking Out Past Siding at Top

Window Frame Sticking Out Past Siding at Top

Top Piece Notched

Top Piece of Trim Notched

Back of Window Trim Notched at Increasing Depths from Top to Bottom

Backside of Window Trim Notched at Increasing Depths from Bottom to Top

After I finished the gable window trim, I spent the rest of the afternoon installing a small shelf over the front door that runs the width of the house. That was a little more difficult than I expected only because the 1 x 8 pine board that I used ended up being a little bit warped in both the horizontal and vertical directions. In the vertical direction, the board flexed pretty well and I was able to fix the warping simply by screwing the shelf down to horizontal support along the front wall. However, fixing the warp in the horizontal direction ended up being impossible. The board was just too stiff. I tried a bunch of things and couldn’t get any of them to work so I eventually decided to just live with it. The result is that there is a quarter inch gap between the edge of the shelf and the front wall. However, you can’t see it unless you climb up on a ladder and look at the shelf from above.

Shelf Over Front Door

Shelf Over Front Door

While I was working yesterday afternoon, Sheila came out and helped with some of the finish work. She added knobs and handles to all of the cabinets, added hinges to the lid of the toilet box and a latch to the closet door. When she finished that, she also cut up and installed all of the corner trim in the bathroom. I was so happy with how all of those things turned out. It’s that kind of finish work that is starting to make the house look really, really good.

Cabinet Hardware!

Cabinet Hardware!

Sheila Adding a Latch for Closet Door

Sheila Adding a Latch for Closet Door

The last thing I did this weekend was to cut out and install the wood panel that goes over the mechanicals cabinet on the side of the space for the fridge. The wood that I used was basically an extra cabinet panel that I purchased when I bought my cabinets from IKEA. However, IKEA no longer makes that style of cabinets, so I had to be really careful not to make any mistakes cutting all the required holes. Luckily, it all came out well and I now have a nice panel that not only hides my mechanicals box, but is also removable if needed. That’s very important because if I ever need to replace my water tank, pulling it out through that opening is the only way to do it.

Panel with Holes Cut

Panel with Holes Cut

Panel in Place

Panel in Place

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